07/10/21

Andrew Green at the EAGE Annual Conference 18 - 21 October 2021

He will be presenting: "A fill-and-spill CCS mega-fairway in the Southern North Sea: a new concept to optimise CO2 storage" in session 4-8.2 CO2 & Waste Storage -  Subsurface Characterization for Waste Storage at  2:15-5:15pm on Thursday 21st October.

 Marianne Nuzzo & Andrew Green have been involved with others from outside IGI Ltd in a project looking at the feasibility, both geologically and technically, of a new CO2 fill mechanism for the Triassic Bunter Sandstone Fm. in the UK Southern North Sea. 

Andrew will be presenting the group's work entitled: "A fill-and-spill CCS mega-fairway in the Southern North Sea: a new concept to optimise CO2 storage" in session 4-8.2 CO2 & Waste Storage -  Subsurface Characterization for Waste Storage at 2:15-5:15pm on Thursday 21st October.  Andrew looks forward to speaking to attendees on the day.

Please read the abstract below:

A potential carbon capture and storage (CCS) fill-and-spill mega-fairway is here identified in UKCS Quadrants 43-44, by combining regional wellbore data with 3D seismic interpretation and migration modelling.

In the study area, the Triassic Bunter Sandstone reservoir shows consistent thicknesses (90-216 m) and prospective core-based porosities and permeabilities (11-28%, 9-669 mD). A connected reservoir is suggested regionally from consistent, near-hydrostatic aquifer pressure gradients (~0.51 psi/ft) and leakage is mitigated through a thick, laterally-effective top seal. Structural closures in the area are generally less than the CO2 column heights necessary to breach the seal. At least eleven mapped closures are shown to link together into the proposed regional fill-and-spill “Silverpit CCS Fairway”. If filled to spill, these traps could cumulatively host up to 7.9 Gt of CO2, three times that of the proposed Endurance CCS Field.

LinkedIn image for APA 2020 draft V2

 

Through management of the injection and fill-spill strategy, this fairway could be future-proofed in relation to CO2 spill hazards, whilst possibly requiring less ‘injector hubs’ to fill the traps. Migration spill-point modelling along the fairway may also inform the placement of permanent, cost-effective multi-physics seabed system for leakage and migration monitoring.

Exploiting fill-and-spill fairways for CCS is a new concept with vast potential applicability globally.

 

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